Mechanobiology
Credit: Peter Allen

Research in mechanobiology seeks to reveal how physical forces and changes in the mechanics of cells and their environment drives cell signaling and responses. Mechanical properties change during development, cell differentiation, physiology, and disease and mechanical deformations of cell and biomaterials can change cell signaling and properties to drive long range coordination cell behavior and responses to mechanical loading. Researchers are building new methods and models to understand how to measure and control the mechanical environment and developing models relating tissue structure and function and chemo-mechanical signaling.

Affiliated Researchers

Associate Professor
Mellichamp Chair in Systems Biology and Bioengineering
The Campas Lab studies the role of mechanics in shaping embryonic tissues and organs, as well as the relation between the genetic and mechanical control of embryonic development.
Assistant Professor
Mechanical Engineering
We study molecular circuits controlling how stem and differentiating cells respond to physical cues.
Director, CBE
Professor of ME, of BMSE, and of MCDB
The Pruitt Lab develops microtechnologies for cellular mechanobiology and mechanical measurements to study how mechanics mediates biological signaling.
Assistant Professor
Engineering biomaterials to probe questions in mechanobiology.
Associate Professor
Mechanical Engineering
Prof. Valentine’s research focuses on the mechanics of cells and tissues and the design of bio-inspired materials.
Assistant Professor
Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology
We use photo-switchable proteins from plants to understand and control complex cellular behaviors.
Assistant Professor
Mechanical Engineering
How does life perform computation?