Events

CBE/ENGR 225 Seminar Presents: Dr. Josh Kogot, Research Biochemist Head, Biotechnology Research Laboratory Intelligent Sensing & Irregular Warfare Branch United States Naval Special Warfare Command, Panama City Division

Tues., January 16, 2018 @ 4pm in ESB #2001

Tuesday, January 16, 2018

ESB #2001

4:00pm-5:00pm

*Light refreshments will be provided* 

Josh Kogot, Ph.D.
Research Biochemist
Head, Biotechnology Research Laboratory

Intelligent Sensing & Irregular Warfare Branch

United States Naval Special Warfare Command, Panama City Division


Host: Sumita Pennathur

 

Marine Bio-inspired and Bio-mimetic Technologies for

Future Naval Capabilities:

ABSTRACT: From the ocean surface to the bottom of the sea, unique marine life has adapted to the harsh ocean environment.  These biological adaptations can provide inspiration for new materials and sensing capabilities to support the warfighter and fleet.  I will provide an overview of the biotechnology research at the Naval Surface Warfare Center in Panama City, from the micro- to macroscale toward novel whole-cell and electro- sensing capabilities to recreating a marine biomaterial as strong as silk and completely stable in the ocean.  On the microscale, naturally occurring cyanbacteria are known to adapt, tolerate, and thrive in the presence of environmental pollutants.  Taking advantage of the adaptability and nitrogen fixing capabilities of cyanobacteria, naturally occurring marine cyanobacteria were used to rapidly degrade TNT in seawater towards creating a whole-cell bio-sensor for TNT.  This has tremendous environmental impact to the Navy for disposing of unexploded ordnances and has promise for explosive sensing in the open ocean.  On the micro- and macroscale, the unrivaled electrosensing capability of the elasmobranchs (sharks, skates, and rays) may provide a novel electrosensor modality in the coastal and littoral waters that are often too murky for acoustic or optical sensing.   

My group has been working on developing microfluidic, bio-mimetic electrosensors inspired by the elasmobranchs using various formulations of hydrogels, proteins, and polysaccharides, to mimic the natural hydrogel material found in the ampullae of Lorenzini in sharks.  Finally, on the macroscale, I have created a biomimetic protein filament derived from the hagfish.  This bottom-dwelling fish uses a filament-based slime as a defense mechanism against predators.  The filament component of the slime has tensile strength similar to spider silk and has tremendous promise as a future marine biomaterial.