Events

CBE/ENGR 225 Faculty Seminar: Dean Ho, Ph.D, Prof. of Bioengineering and Oral Biology and Medicine, UCLA Co-Director, The Weintraub Center for Reconstructive Biotechnology Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center President-Emeritus, SLAS Board of Directors

Tuesday, February 23, 2016, at 4:00 pm in ESB 2001


Dean Ho, Ph.D.

Professor of Bioengineering and Oral Biology and Medicine, UCLA

Co-Director, The Weintraub Center for Reconstructive Biotechnology

Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center

President-Emeritus, SLAS Board of Directors

 

 

Tuesday, February 23, 2016

4:00 pm

ESB 2001

*Light refreshments will be provided* 

The Intersection of Nanotechnology and Precision Medicine  

ABSTRACT: Nanodiamonds have been utilized for a broad spectrum of drug delivery and imaging applications with marked enhancements in efficacy and safety [1-3]. For example, the administration of nanodiamond-doxorubicin (NDX) complexes towards breast, liver, and brain cancer therapy has resulted in substantial improvements in drug tolerance and decreased systemic and localized toxicity. In addition, nanodiamond-gadolinium complexes have mediated one order of magnitude improvements in per-gadolinium relaxivity. Recently, nanodiamonds have been used to reinforce various polymeric devices including contact lenses and other platforms to enable lysozyme-triggered drug release for potential applications in glaucoma therapy [4]. Nanodiamond incorporation into these devices simultaneously enhanced the mechanical robustness of the device while also sustaining oxygen and water content properties, indicating no adverse effects upon potential wear comfort. Following the demonstration of improved monotherapy using nanodiamond drug delivery, it is becoming increasingly important to develop optimized nanomedicine-enhanced combination therapy. However, conventional approaches utilize additive dosing, which serves as a major barrier towards the systematic identification of drug-dose ratios that can realize globally optimal efficacy and safety of treatment. Our recent work has demonstrated that a powerful mechanism-independent technology platform, termed Phenotypic Personalized Medicine.Drug Development (PPM.DD) is capable of rapidly optimizing nanodiamond-modified as well as unmodified drug combinations based upon experimentally-validated data [5]. This approach will result in markedly-improved response rates to treatment through the rational combinatorial therapy design.

References

 

[1] Mochalin et al., Nature Nanotechnology, 2012.
[2] Chow et al., Science Translational Medicine, 2011.
[3] Chow et al., Science Translational Medicine, 2013.
[4] Kim et al., ACS Nano, 2014.
[5] Ho et al., Science Advances, 2015.