Events

CBE, CNSI, CSEP, GSDS, OFFICE OF DEVELOPMENT-PARENT FUND, AND WISE PRESENT A CAREER TALK PRESENTS A SEMINAR: Scott Baker, Ph.D., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Tuesday, October 18, 2016, @ 2:30pm, Elings Hall, Room #1601

Current Topics in Bioengineering Career Talk

Tuesday, October 18, 2016

Elings 1601

2:30– 3:30 pm

*Light refreshments will be provided*

RSVP at: https://csep.cnsi.ucsb.edu/forms/PDS/Registration.php

 Scott Baker, Ph.D.

Science Theme Lead, Biosystem Dynamics Design

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

 

Career Talk: What I Did For Summer Vacation

(And The Two Decades That Preceded It) 

This summer I led a team that submitted a proposal for a DOE Bioenergy Research Center (BRC). The proposal was a massive effort and fantastic learning experience. I will discuss my path to becoming a researcher at PNNL and how pulling together the BRC proposal simultaneously induced more grey hairs and made me nostalgic for graduate school.

BIO: Scott Baker joined the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in 2003 to conduct research in the area of fungal biotechnology. In 2012, he moved into the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a DOE User National User Facility located at and operated by PNNL. At EMSL he is the Science Theme Lead for the Biosystem Dynamics and Design Science Theme, which focuses on spatial and temporal dynamics of biological pathways in microbes, fungi and plants to advance our understanding of the carbon cycle and accelerate production of biofuels and bioproducts. In this role, he coordinates and implements science and strategy. As a researcher, he has published nearly 80 peer-reviewed journal articles related to fungal biotechnology and genomics applied to production of biofuels and bioproducts. Dr. Baker has been a PI and co-PI supporting a variety of funding agencies, most recently, DOE's Office of Biological and Environmental Research. Dr. Baker’s PhD is from Northwestern University in the area of tumor cell biology. He completed postdoctoral fellowships at University of Arizona, studying Drosophila genetics, and at Syngenta’s Torrey Mesa Research Institute in San Diego, conducting research in the area of fungal plant pathogen functional genomics.